How Telling Your Story of Loss May Help

Grieve Well

Today’s scan of grief research led me to some studies of restorative retelling. It’s a kind of talk therapy for people like me who lost loved ones violently and as a result are suffering from things like PTSD, depression and prolonged grief. When my only son Brady died of suicide at 16 in 2016, I was first on the scene and suffice to say I have experienced a lot of distress connected with that.

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This 2014 article from the Death Studies journal described the restorative retelling therapy as “an exercise in which participants draw the scene of the dying and share the drawing and the story of the dying with other group members.” They do this in groups of six to 10 people and the treatment, in this case, consisted of 10 weekly sessions.

It sounds a little like the repeated slow-motion reenactments I did with a therapist after Brady…

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About Sue Rosenbloom, M.A., C.T.

Thanatologist: Loss and Grief Coach - My blog is for educational purposes only. I am not a licensed professional counselor - Bachelor of Arts in Human Studies - Marylhurst University (2007)- Certificate in Thanatology - Hood College (2008) Master of Arts in Thanatology - Hood College (2009) Certificate in Thanatology - The-Association for Death Education and Counseling (The highest level of loss and grief education). * Hospice, Alzheimers and Senior's Advocate * Former first responder for Trauma Intervention Program, Inc. (TIP) * Hospice and Bereavement Volunteer for Providence Hospice Bereavement Program * Association for Death Education and Counseling Member * National Alliance for Bereavement of Children * Hood College Thanatology Association * American Group Psychotherapy Association * Marylhurst Gerontolgy Association * Oregon Gerontology Association * Hospice, Loss, Grief and Bereavement Researcher * Creative Writer
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